Night Shift

Thanks for the good poetry Glenys.

lifecameos

With our company always on call
we were rostered on different shifts
though some did only night shifts.

Some of us died young,
under retiring age.
All those who died within
my ten years there had
only worked night shifts
for at least several years.

Doris had a brain tumour
Enid had stomach cancer
May had lung cancer
Alf had a massive heart attack.
Young Jack was medicated
for seizures. He went to
sleep one night for ever.

Relief workers came in
each time staff attended
yet another funeral.

We all knew those who passed away
had spent so long on night shifts
yet no one questioned it.

I do wonder
are our bodies
chewed up turning
day into night
night into day ?

For some do not survive night shift.

Originally posted 13 March 2016.

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The Pantry

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Copyright © 2017, Richard Rensberry

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No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means electronic, mechanical, photo-copied, recorded or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the publisher and authors.

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Rhyme Your Way into a Child’s Heart

 

If being a successful children’s book author is one of your dreams, may I suggest rhyme be part and parcel to your writing arsenal. Children can be a rather finicky and discerning audience when it comes to words that grab their precious attention. As a writer I have always gravitated to alliterative sound and rhyme to help achieve this task. I believe rhyme can be used as a major gimmick for capturing and maintaining a child’s interest. Continue reading

United States Citizenship

Naturalization Oath of Allegiance to the United States of America

Oath

“I hereby declare, on oath, that I absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty, of whom or which I have heretofore been a subject or citizen; that I will support and defend the Constitution and laws of the United States of America against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I will bear arms on behalf of the United States when required by the law; that I will perform noncombatant service in the Armed Forces of the United States when required by the law; that I will perform work of national importance under civilian direction when required by the law; and that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; so help me God.”

Note: In certain circumstances there can be a modification or waiver of the Oath of Allegiance. Read Chapter 5 of A Guide to Naturalization for more information.

The principles embodied in the Oath are codified in Section 337(a) in the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), which provides that all applicants shall take an oath that incorporates the substance of the following:

  1. Support the Constitution;
  2. Renounce and abjure absolutely and entirely all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty of whom or which the applicant was before a subject or citizen;
  3. Support and defend the Constitution and laws of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic;
  4. Bear true faith and allegiance to the same; and
  5. A. Bear arms on behalf of the United States when required by the law; or
    B. Perform noncombatant service in the Armed Forces of the United States when required by the law; or
    C. Perform work of national importance under civilian direction when required by the law.